J-PAL North America, based at MIT, leads J-PAL’s work in the North America region. J-PAL North America conducts randomized evaluations, builds partnerships for evidence-informed policymaking, and helps partners scale up effective programs.

Our work spans a wide range of sectors including health care, housing, criminal justice, education, and economic mobility. We leverage research by affiliated professors from universities across the continent and a full-time staff of researchers, policy experts, and administrative professionals to generate and disseminate rigorous evidence about which anti-poverty social policies work and why.

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Blog

Introducing Matthew Notowidigdo, new co-scientific director of J-PAL North America

In this interview, the new Co-Scientific Director of J-PAL North America, Matthew Notowidigdo discusses his background and previous work with J-PAL North America, and he and Amy Finkelstein outline their priorities and goals for their work together as co-scientific directors.
 

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Blog

Reflecting back and looking forward: A decade of generating evidence with J-PAL North America

Lawrence Katz, former co-scientific director of J-PAL North America, reflects on nearly ten years advising the regional office and provides key insights for the future of evidence-based policymaking in the region. 

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Blog

How policymakers can ensure they’re supporting housing policies that work: Demystifying randomized evaluations

Katie Fallon (Housing Matters) sits down with Bridget Mercier (J-PAL North America) to demystify randomized evaluations and underscore their value for policymakers and practitioners. 

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Blog

Researching racial equity: Evaluating “Ban the Box” policies

In this interview with J-PAL staff, Amanda Agan discusses her 2018 evaluation of "Ban the Box" policies on employment outcomes, finding disparate impacts by race, and explores the role of randomized evaluations in advancing racial equity.