Imran Rasul

Affiliated Professor
Professor of Economics University College London

Imran Rasul is a Professor in the Department of Economics at University College London. His areas of interest focus on labor economics and household economics. Previous and ongoing projects include studying whether and how a household's behavior is influenced by the presence and characteristics of its extended family and the evaluation of a female adolescent empowerment program in rural Uganda and Tanzania.

Featured Affiliate Interview

Seeing the dedication of our research teams and partners working in often difficult places and challenging times is quite amazing and helps me keep everything in perspective.

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What got you interested in development economics, and particularly in labor markets and household economics?

Travelling to South Asia in my childhood was a real eye-opener—it left me wondering about how the lives of my cousins living there were on the one hand so different from my life in London, but at the same time, there were many similarities too. Later when I came to study economics at the London School of Economics (LSE), I began to realize how it could help me start to make sense of some of these differences and similarities. But my own interest probably would have petered out except for the wonderful and enthusiastic lecturers in development that I had at LSE.

What is one current research project that you're particularly excited about?

I am involved in an evaluation of a skills-provision project in Sierra Leone, targeted towards adolescent girls. The baseline was completed just before the Ebola crisis, and we are only now returning to the field for a first follow-up. Understanding whether the intervention might have helped girls cope against the aggregate Ebola shock is going to be fascinating.

What is your "dream evaluation"? (It doesn't have to be feasible!)

I would like to understand a lot more about the determinants of the quality of project implementation. In an ideal world, being able to run an evaluation working with multiple agencies (government, private, and NGO sectors) providing the same intervention, to understand how supply-side performances differ and why, would be great (but a pipe dream).

What is your most memorable story from the field?

Seeing the dedication of our research teams and partners working in often difficult places and challenging times is quite amazing and helps me keep everything in perspective.