Crime and Violence Initiative RFP

Overview

The Crime and Violence Initiative (CVI) fosters experimental research on crime and social and political violence. Crime and violence can hinder economic development and urban growth, and exacerbate governance challenges by furthering corruption and draining public sector resources. The initiative funds evaluations that focus on preventing, mitigating, and responding to the effects of crime and violence.

Timeline

CVI is only accepting off-cycle proposals at the moment. Our Fall 2020 RFP will be announced in June.

Eligibility

J-PAL affiliates, J-PAL postdocs, and invited researchers are eligible to apply for any type of CVI funding. PhD students who have a J-PAL affiliate or invited researcher on their thesis committee may be eligible to apply for travel/proposal development grants, pilot study grants, or up to $50,000 for full RCT grants.

Types of Proposals

Four types of proposals will be considered this round:

  • Travel/Proposal development grants (up to $10,000)
  • Pilot grants (up to $75,000)
  • Full RCT grants (up to $400,000)
  • Evidence use and policy outreach support (up to $20,000; can be submitted on a rolling basis)

CVI also accepts proposals for research on violence and homicide reduction in Latin America and the Caribbean, supported by a grant from the Open Society Foundations, which is run through and managed by IPA’s Peace & Recovery Program. 

 

What makes a strong proposal?

Past CVI funding rounds have highlighted that strong proposals will include: 

  1. Direct connection to CVI guiding principles and focus areas, listed in the CVI’s RFP overview (sections I-V), showing how the research proposed would further these priorities, especially generalizability and innovation.
  2. Strong base in the theory and previous literature, while also demonstrating the research’s policy relevance and potential to advance the current academic understanding of certain issues. 
  3. Level of partner/project development commensurate with the proposal type. Applicants that are still developing a partner relationship or have not yet addressed implementation risks may want to consider applying for travel/proposal development grants or pilot grants to further develop their ideas.
  4. Clear and concise language, laying out their intentions and core details (e.g. research design, implementing partner relationships, etc.) in an organized and simple way.
     

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