Labor Markets

J-PAL’s Labor Markets sector evaluates what works to get the unemployed back into the workforce, to ease young people’s transitions from the classroom to the working world, and to provide the skills entrepreneurs need to succeed.

The Youth Initiative seeks to evaluate policies and interventions that can help disadvantaged youth to successfully navigate the transition from adolescence to adulthood. This includes policies to promote integration of youth into the labor force, foster entrepreneuriship, enhance life skills, and help youth avoid risky behavior.

Publication

See Tomorrow's Jobs, Invest in Girls Today

Making employment opportunities for women more salient and accessible led to increased investment in education and nutrition of girls, and delayed marriage and childbearing among women in rural India...

affiliate

Lori Beaman

Lori Beaman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Northwestern University. Beaman's research interests lie in development and labor economics with a focus on the role of social...

Résumés were randomly assigned black- or white-sounding names. Researchers examined the impact of the name on callbacks.

Evaluation

Discrimination in the Job Market in the United States

Researchers examined the level of racial discrimination in the United States labor market by randomly assigning identical résumés black-sounding or white-sounding names and observing the impact on...

Publication

Public or Private? Job Counseling in France

An intensive counseling program for job seekers at risk of long-term unemployment in France helped them find work sooner than the standard low-intensity counseling program, and the counseling was...

Publication

Youth Initiative Review Paper

About one-fifth of the world’s population is between the ages of 15 and 24, yet they represent a disproportionate amount of the unemployed. In this review paper, J-PAL Sector co-Chairs Marianne...

Evaluation

The Impact of Employment on High-Risk Men in Liberia

Without special attention to creating economic opportunities for ex-combatants, they may be more likely to join rebellious groups, commit crime, and otherwise threaten political stability. In Liberia...